Lessons from the Links, No. 1: Things Might Go Wrong. Deal with It.

Quick backstory for those unaware… Here in the U.S., most of our golf courses strive to be manicured to perfection, but links golf in Scotland is often played on much more unpredictable terrain with scruffy imperfections, bumps and knobs coming into play. This can lead to some, ahem, interesting circumstances.
Let’s say you hit what seems like the perfect shot, but it lands and takes a weird bounce in the wrong direction.
Now what?
Some golfers get frustrated, get mad, start blaming the ground for a “bad bounce” – and by doing so, suddenly they’re compounding the problem by being in their head when they should be focusing on their next shot.
The more you maintain your composure and deal with the reality of the situation instead of the story you’re telling yourself, the better you’ll perform moving forward.
So… What’s the business equivalent of this?
Easy…
There are going to be times when you seemingly do everything right… but a transaction still goes sideways. Or it goes completely off the rails. Or a client gets mad even though it’s not your fault.
Sound familiar?
How do you handle it?
Do you let it eat you up inside? Or do you calmly accept it, re-assess the situation and find a solution?
As soon as you learn to embrace those weird bounces in both golf and business, you’ll enjoy yourself so much more and look at that “next shot” as a fun challenge, not some vendetta out to get you. It’ll make you better and bring greater fulfillment to your success.
Remember: It’s not the situation. It’s how you react to it that matters.
 

Lessons from the Links, No. 2: Always Operate from a Strategic Plan

You might think that if the object of golf is to get the ball in the hole in as few strokes as possible, it makes sense to hit every shot directly at the hole.
That’s not actually the case.
One of the beautiful nuances of the game is that some holes give you an advantage by playing from a certain direction. Also, golf holes are full of obstacles ­– they actually call them “hazards” – you want to avoid.
Believe me… On my trip this year, I found far too many score-killing bunkers, and next time I would opt to play some safer shots to avoid those dangerous hazards.
So what’s the business lesson on this one?
The more strategic you can be in your planning and execution, the more successful you’re going to be. Also, a straight line isn’t always the most effective route to reach your ultimate destination.
Before your next transaction, what if you sat down and mapped out how you’re going to avoid all the potential pitfalls along the way? I bet that you’d streamline the process simply by reminding yourself of what NOT to do.
Don’t just start taking action. Create a plan, follow it, and adjust accordingly along the way.